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The First Love Story

Adam, Eve, and Us

flsfinal3dFrom the New York Times bestselling author of Walking the Bible and Abraham comes a revelatory journey across four continents and 4,000 years exploring how Adam and Eve introduced the idea of love into the world, and how they continue to shape our deepest feelings about relationships, family, and togetherness. READ MORE

 

The Secrets of Happy Families

Improve Your Mornings, Rethink Family Dinner, Fight Smarter, Go Out and Play, and Much More

The Secrets of Happy Families book coverBest-selling author and New York Times family columnist Bruce Feiler found himself squeezed between aging parents and rising children. He set out on a three-year journey to find the smartest ideas, cutting-edge research, and novel solutions to make his family happier. READ MORE

 

The Council of Dads

A Story of Family, Friendship & Learning How to Live

The Council of Dads book coverWhen bestselling author Bruce Feiler was diagnosed with a malignant tumor in his leg, he could only imagine all the walks he might not take with his daughters, the ballet recitals he would miss, the art projects left undone, and the aisles he might not walk down. READ MORE

Read Bruce’s cancer diary.

Bruce's latest news

Bruce discusses the Secrets of Happy Families on the latest Digital Dads podcast.

Announcing Bruce’s forthcoming book, The First Love Story, from Penguin Random House

Watch the award-winning PBS series, Sacred Journeys with Bruce Feiler.

Bruce talks about “Happy Families” at Google.

See Bruce’s up-to-date list of speaking topics, and learn more about inviting him to your event.

Where Have All the Christians Gone?

Christianity is plummeting in America, while the number of non-believers is skyrocketing.

A shocking new study of Americans’ religious beliefs shows the beginnings of a major realignment in Americans’ relationship with God. The American Religious Identification Survey (ARIS) reveals that Protestants now represent half of all Americans, down almost 20 percent in the last twenty years. In the coming months, America will become a minority Protestant nation for the first time since the Pilgrims.

The number of people who claim no religious affiliation, meanwhile, has doubled since 1990 to fifteen percent, its highest point in history. Non-believers now represent the third-highest group of Americans, after Catholics and Baptists.

Other headlines:

  1. The number of Christians has declined 12% since 1990, and is now 76%, the lowest percentage in American history.
  2. The growth of non-believers has come largely from men. Twenty percent of men express no religious affiliation; 12% of women.
  3. Young people are fleeing faith. Nearly a quarter of Americans in their 20’s profess no organized religion.
  4. But these non-believers are not particularly atheist. That number hasn’t budged and stands at less than 1 percent. (Agnostics are similarly less than 1 percent.) Instead, these individuals have a belief in God but no interest in organized religion, or they believe in a personal God but not in a formal faith tradition.

The implications for American society are profound. Americans’ relationship with God, which drove many of the country’s great transformations from the pilgrims to the founding fathers, the Civil War to the civil rights movement, is still intact. Eighty-two percent of Americans believe in God or a higher power.

But at the same time, the study offers yet another wake-up call for religious institutions.

First, catering to older believers is a recipe for failure; younger Americans are tuning out.

Second, Americans are interested in God, but they don’t think existing institutions are helping them draw closer to God.

Finally, Americans’ interest in religion has not always been stable. It dipped following the Revolution and again following Civil War. In both cases it rebounded because religious institutions adapted and found new ways of relating to everyday Americans.

Today, the rise of disaffection is so powerful that different denominations need to band together to find a shared language of God that can move beyond fading divisions and move toward a partnership of different-but-equal traditions.

Or risk becoming Europe, where religion is fast becoming an afterthought.

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One Response to “Where Have All the Christians Gone?”

  1. Mary says:

    You’re comments below are non-sensical or at least misleading:

    Christianity is plummeting in America, while the number of non-believers is skyrocketing.

    4. But these non-believers are not particularly atheist. That number hasn’t budged and stands at less than 1 percent. (Agnostics are similarly less than 1 percent.) Instead, these individuals have a belief in God but no interest in organized religion, or they believe in a personal God but not in a formal faith tradition.

    If you have a belief in God, you are not a non-believer. If you believe in a personal God but not in a formal faith tradition, you are not a non-believer. You are throwing a lot of different fruits in the same basket. What you are seeing is a moving away from traditional church denominations in addition to a substantial growth in non-denominational evangelical Christian churches. This is certainly not shocking to anyone who has been paying attention to the re-alignment of Christians during the last 20 years or so. And, I would certainly classify most non-denominational Christians as Protestants, so your percentages may not be as shocking as you imply. To answer your question, “Where have all the Christians gone?” I would simply say, take a look at the non-denominational churches in your town or city. In fact, stop in and say hi. You might be surprised!

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